A Tip for New Mac Users

May 27, 2007

A nice tip for new Mac users is to not touch any crucial files that is needed by an application. Why? Here are a few examples:

1) Microsoft Folder in Documents. Whilst people like to organise folders themselves, a few folders, such as this one, should not be touched. This is because Microsoft Office needs to locate the files here in order to work and moving it will cause problems for the application.

2) Sometimes you’ll find files that appear from nowhere with strange extensions. Don’t just delete these because they look suspicious, google them as sometimes, little important files like to unhide themselves.

3) I would say this is the most important rule as a lot of people make this mistake and a lot of the time it can be very costly. Do not ever, under any circumstance, organise the iPhoto library from within Finder. (The Mac equivalent of Windows Explorer) Always adjust your files from within iPhoto unless they’re referenced in their original location. Editing the file names etc. can mess up the way iPhoto works and may lead to you having to start from scratch. If you need to access a photo export it from iPhoto or you can locate it from the iPhoto library and COPY it. Just leave the original file.

The 3rd mistake is a very common one made so I hope that this post will help clarify that unless it’s something you created yourself and know what programs rely on it, DON’T TOUCH IT!


Windows On Mac OS X

April 8, 2007

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One of the main features of the new Macs that Apple tries to sell to people thinking about switching is the ability to run Windows on the Mac OS X operating system. Apple hopes that people who are only staying with Windows because of the software can move away from that and get a Mac with a security blanket. (The ability to run Windows)

There are two main ways to run Windows. Through Parallels or Boot Camp. (Although you can run SOME software through a program called Crossover, but I’ll go into that next week) There are a few main differences between Parallels and Boot Camp.

Parallels is shareware and runs Windows in a “virtual” environment, meaning that it pretend that a computer is running inside your computer. Therefore, this allows users to work both in the Mac OS X and Windows at the same time.

However, as you are running two operating systems at the same time, they must share resources, making your computer slower (especially if you don’t have enough RAM). Also in it’s current stage, Parallels doesn’t support 3D acceleration, meaning no games.

Boot Camp on the other hand, is a free beta available from Apple’s website. The advantages of Boot Camp is that you have full access to the computers resources, therefore allowing it to run at full speed. You also have pretty much no limitations so your computer will become exactly like your friends Windows computer, allowing you to do everything he/she does. (Games, Windows Only Software etc.) But since you can do everything a Windows computer can, you’re also open to all the dangers of a Windows computer. (Viruses, Spyware)

In order to run Boot Camp you have to reboot your computer and hold down “option” when it’s booting up again. You then select which partition of your HD you want to boot into. Your Mac one or Windows.

It must be noted though, that whichever way you decide to go, you must purchase your own copy of Windows to install, meaning running Windows isn’t cheap. Also if you want to use Boot Camp you must have Windows XP SP2 or more recently, Windows Vista. (With the latest 1.2 release)

Parallels has a free trial which is avaliable for download from here. http://www.parallels.com/en/products/desktop/ Boot Camp can be downloaded from Apple’s website. http://www.apple.com/macosx/bootcamp/


Fixing my Macbook Touchpad

March 11, 2007

Recently, my Macbook’s touchpad button has become a little unresponsive and not as strong as it used to be. This bugged me a lot and I thought I had some dirt underneath that was hindering it’s movement. That is until I found this link.

Turns out I’m not the only one having the problem and I don’t think it’s dirt at all. The best part is, there is a very easy fix. Just place some origami in the bottom of your Macbook and you’re all set to go. This is one of the most creative thing and useful things I have found.


Mac Software

March 7, 2007



If you just bought a Mac or you’re wondering what’s some good software that you can use on your existing Mac, then I suggest this site – http://osx.iusethis.com/

Basically it’s a site that stores the info of any program people publish on the site and then other people who use the program can click the “I Use This” button. It’s a great way to find great new software, see how many other people use the software that you use and maybe even find a better alternative.